Word Software Tips

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Date

Tip

5/25/16

When you first install Word, the working directory is set to a default directory, which is normally "My Documents." You may want to change the default location to match your working habits. You can quickly change the default startup directory by following these steps:

  1. Display the Word Options dialog box. (In Word 2007 click the Office button and then click Word Options. In Word 2010 and Word 2013 display the File tab of the ribbon and then click Options.)
  2. At the left side of the dialog box click Save. (See Figure 1.)
  3. word

    Figure 1. The Save options of the Word Options dialog box.

  4. To the right of the Default File Location field (Word 2007) or the Default Local File Location field (later versions of Word), click the Browse button. Word displays a dialog box in which you can browse and select directories.
  5. Select the directory you want used as the startup directory for your documents.
  6. Click on the OK button to select the directory.
  7. Click on the OK button to close the Word Options dialog box.
  8. Exit and restart Word.

4/5/16

Collaborate on Word documents with real-time co-authoring

When you and your colleagues want to collaborate on a document, use real time co-authoring to see everyone’s changes as they happen.
First you save the document to OneDrive or SharePoint Online, so others can work in it.
Next, you invite people to edit it with you. When they open and work on the document in Word 2016 or Word Online, you'll see each other’s changes as soon as they're made.
Save a document online and invite others to work on it with you
  • Click Share > Save to cloud, select the OneDrive or SharePoint Online location and folder you want, and clickSave.
The Share icon is highlighted on the right side of the ribbon
OneDrive and SharePoint locations for saving the document are highlighted
You only have to do this once for each document. The next time you open it, it’ll save back to the same location automatically.
NOTE: If you’ve never saved a document online before, click Add a Place, and then add your OneDrive or SharePoint service by signing in.
  • In the Share pane, do either of these:
    • To have Word send people a link to your document, type their email addresses in the Invite people box. Set their permissions to Can edit, and add a message if you want to. Make sure the Automatically share changes box is set to either Ask me or Always, and then click Share.
The option to invite people to share a document is shown
    • To invite them yourself, click Get a sharing link at the bottom of the Share pane, and paste that link into email or an instant message. (Get a sharing link won’t be available if you’re using SharePoint Online and your site admin has disabled that option.)
Get a sharing link is magnified
Start working together in a document
  • Open and edit the document in Word 2016 or Word Online. There’s no special co-authoring mode or command to begin co-authoring.
  • If you’re using Word 2016 and haven’t already agreed to let others see your changes, say Yes to automatic sharing.
Other People Are Editing This Document prompt is shown from Share command
When people follow the link you sent them, your doc will open in their version of Word, or in their web browser (Word Online). If they’re also using Word Online or Word 2016 and have agreed to automatically share changes, you’ll see their work as it happens.
Word shows where other people are editing the document
  • Colored flags will show you exactly where in the document each person is working.
Flag shows the location of another author in the document
  • Word will alert you when people enter or leave.
NOTE: If someone who didn’t opt in to real-time co-authoring is working on the document when you are, you’ll see that they’re in the document, but you won’t see their changes until they save the document.
2/2/16 Configure your paste options

Microsoft Office Paste settings

Believe it or not, you can actually control how Microsoft Office deals with pasting words. This can be attained by clicking on the Office button (the logo at the top left), navigating to Word Options, and then to Advanced. From there you should be able to see a Cut, Copy, and Paste option that will let you configure your options. This can allow you to do things like disable hyperlinking when pasting and other formatting options to make life easier.
10/13/15

Track changes

When you want to see who’s changing what in your document, turn on Track Changes.

Click Review > Track Changes.

Track changes on the Word ribbon

Now Word’s in Simple Markup view. Word marks up any changes that anyone makes to the document and shows you where the changes are by displaying a line near the margin.

The line at the margin to show a tracked change is at that location

Word shows a little balloon where someone’s made a comment. To see a comment, click the comment balloon.

The comment icon in Simple Markup

To see the changes, click the line near the margin. That switches Word into All Markup view.

Track changes showing in All Markup view

If you’d rather see all the comments, but not all the changes, click Show Comments.

Show Comments command

Keep Track Changes on

You can prevent someone else from turning Track Changes off by locking Track Changes on with a password. (Be sure to remember the password so you can turn Track Changes off when you’re ready to.)

  1. Click Review.

  2. Click the arrow by Track Changes and click Lock Tracking.

Lock changes command on the Track Changes menu

  1. Type a password, and then type it again in the Reenter to confirm box.

  2. Click OK

While tracked changes are locked, you can’t turn off change tracking, and you can’t accept or reject the changes.

To stop locking, click the arrow by Track Changes and click Lock Tracking< again. Word prompts you to type your password. After you type your password and click OK, Track Changes is still on, but you can accept and reject changes.

Turn off Track Changes

To turn off Track Changes, click the Track Changes button. Word stops marking up new changes—but all of the changes that were already tracked stay marked up in the document until you remove them.

Remove tracked changes

IMPORTANT    The only way to get tracked changes out of a document is to accept or reject them. Choosing No Markup in the Display for Review box helps you see what the final document will look like—but it only hides tracked changes temporarily. The changes are not deleted, and they’ll show up again the next time anyone opens the document. To delete the tracked changes permanently, accept or reject them.

Click Review > Next > Accept or Reject.

The Accept, Reject, and Next buttons

Word accepts the change or removes it and then moves to the next change.

To delete a comment, select it and click Review > Delete. To delete all comments, click Delete > Delete All Comments in Document.

TIP    Before you share the final version of your document, it’s a good idea to run Document Inspector. This tool checks for tracked changes and comments, hidden text, personal names in properties, and other information you might not want to share widely. To run Document Inspector, click File > Info > Check for Issues > Inspect Document.

 

6/30/15

Vertical Alignment of an Inline Graphic

Ever have the problem when you places an inline graphic in his document that is taller than a single line of text, the text defaults to being aligned with the bottom of the graphic.

The default behavior for inline graphics is bottom alignment with the text, not the text with the graphic. So the solution involves adjusting the vertical positioning of the graphic.

Word treats inline graphics as a single character. You can change the vertical alignment of an inline graphic by treating it as you would any other single character whose vertical position you wanted to adjust. Follow these steps:

  1. Select the inline graphic by clicking on it once.
  2. Press Ctrl+D. Word displays the Font dialog box.
  3. Make sure the Character Spacing tab is displayed. (See Figure 1.)
  4. Inline Graphics Tips

    Figure 1. The Character Spacing tab of the Font dialog box.

  5. Using the Position drop-down list, choose Lowered.
  6. Enter a value in the By box, to the right of the Position control, that represents the number of points by which you want to lower the graphic.
  7. Click OK.

You may need to play with the value entered in the By box (step 5) to get just the look you want. The value you use will depend on the size of the graphic whose position you are adjusting and the characteristics of the font used in the paragraph.

 

6/9/15

Making Repetitive Tasks Quicker

Word documents aren’t always unique – in fact, I’d bet that most of the content created with Word is in some way a repetition of content that’s already been created before. That may sound odd, but think about it. Businesses use Word constantly, and businesses put out a lot of documentation with repetitive information like the business’s address, the names of employees, and so on.

If you’re in a situation like this you can make life easier by creating a Quick Part. Select whatever text or content you plan on frequently using and then go to the Insert tab. Find the Quick Parts button and click on it to call a drop-down menu.

Now, click on Save Selection to Quick Part Gallery. A window will open prompting you to enter the name of the quick part. You might want to create a new category for it if you intend to have many different quick-parts, but you shouldn’t have much reason to change the Save In and Options categories.

Now that you’ve made a Quick Part, you can enter it by clicking the Quick Parts button and then selecting it from the drop-down menu. Doing this for common information, such as a business address, can save a lot of time and effort.

1/6/15

Understanding Smart Cut and Paste

Word includes a feature, by default, that tries to make your editing chores just a little easier. This feature, called smart cut and paste, adds or removes spaces when you are cutting or pasting text. This may sound odd, but it is really helpful in many situations. For instance, if you are pasting a word into a sentence, smart cut and paste makes sure that spaces are added around the word so that it doesn't "run in" to the words you are pasting near.

Likewise, when you cut a word from a sentence, sometimes the cut might result in two spaces left: the ones that used to surround the word being pulled. Instead, smart cut and paste results in one of the spaces being automatically deleted so the resulting sentence has (at least) the proper number of spaces in it.

You can control smart cut and paste in the following manner:

  1. Display the Word Options dialog box. (In Word 2007 click the Office button and then click Word Options. In Word 2010 display the File tab of the ribbon and then click Options.)
  2. Click Advanced at the left side of the dialog box. (See Figure 1.)
  3. word

    Figure 1. The advanced options of the Word Options dialog box.

  4. Set the Use Smart Cut and Paste check box as desired. If selected, the feature is turned on; if not selected, it is off.
  5. Click the Settings button to make changes in how smart cut and paste works.
  6. Click on OK.
12/2/14

Managing Corporate Templates

In a corporate environment that uses Word, it is not uncommon that the company has developed a standard set of templates that define the "look" wanted for corporate communications. Unfortunately, if users make changes to the styles within the templates (there are many ways to do this without even purposefully trying) then the original templates can easily become corrupted.

For instance, let's say that Mary uses the corporate template to create a letter, and then saves the letter to disk. Later, Bill creates a letter using the same template, but makes a couple of changes to the styles in the course of creating and saving his document. The next time Mary opens her letter, the style changes made by Bill will affect the look of her letter.

Getting around this problem involves a three-pronged approach. First, you need to save your corporate templates in a protected manner; second, you need to set up Word to access them properly; and third, you need to do some user education.

First, make sure your templates are stored on the company's network server in a special folder you created just for the purpose of storing the templates. Make sure that everyone has access to the folder, but it should be read-only access. In addition, it doesn't hurt to make sure that the templates are saved as read-only. If you have any problems with setting up and storing the templates in this manner, your network administrator should be able to do it quite quickly.

Second, follow these steps within Word:

  1. Display the Word Options dialog box. (In Word 2007 click the Office button and then click Word Options. In Word 2010 click the File tab of the ribbon and then click Options.)
  2. Click the Advanced option at the left of the dialog box.
  3. Scroll through the list of options until you see the General section.
  4. Click the File Locations button. Word displays the File Locations dialog box. (See Figure 1.)
  5. word

    Figure 1. The File Locations dialog box.

  6. Make sure that the Workgroup Templates specification points to the special network server folder you set up in the previous step.
  7. Make sure the User Templates option is set to a private folder either on the user's hard drive or within their space on the network server.
  8. Click OK.

Third, instruct users that if they want to make changes to a template (so they can use those changes over and over again) they should copy the template from the protected area on the network server to their user template area and give the template a new name. (This copying should take place outside of Word, using the capabilities of Windows itself.) Changes can now be made to the template without affecting anyone else.

7/14/14

Keeping Table Rows Together

You may believe that you can keep tables rows together if you select the text in a row and then choose Keep Lines Together from the Line and Page Breaks tab of the Paragraph dialog box. This is a common trick that you can read about in lots of places—including the pages ofWordTips. What you may not know is that choosing this option may not always give the desired result.
The reason is that Word apparently ignores this setting within tables. (Astounding, isn't it?) Instead, Word pays attention to a setting in the Tables dialog box. If you look at the Row tab of the Cell Height and Width dialog box (Word 97) or the Row tab of the Table Properties dialog box (Word 2000 and later), you see a check box entitled Allow Row to Break Across Pages. (See Figure 1.) This is the only option that controls whether a page can break in the middle of a row. If the option is not set (the check box is clear), then the row won't break, regardless of the Keep Lines Together setting. Conversely, if the option is set, then the row can break, even if that means splitting up the paragraph text within the row.
http://images.tn-services.com/S01/Figs/T865F1.jpg
Figure 1. The Row tab of the Table Properties dialog box.
Upon reflection, you might think there is method to this madness. After all, the setting in the Paragraph dialog box should only affect paragraphs, and the setting in the Tables dialog box should affect tables. Under this logic, however, you would expect that if a table cell contains a long paragraph (10 or 12 lines), and the page break is going to occur in the middle of the paragraph, that the Keep Lines Together setting would still keep the single paragraph together. Unfortunately, it doesn't. Word still pays attention to only the Allow Row to Break Across Pages setting.

6/24/14

Understanding SmartArt

SmartArt is a new type of graphical tool included in the latest versions of Word. SmartArt is, basically, a way to make organized presentation art. (Some folks think that SmartArt was created as a tool primarily for PowerPoint.) It is suitable for "organizational" types of artwork, such as org charts and process lists.

To insert a piece of SmartArt into your document, display the Insert tab of the ribbon. In the Illustrations group, click the SmartArt tool. Word displays the Choose a SmartArt Graphic dialog box. (See Figure 1.)

word

Figure 1. The Choose a SmartArt Graphic dialog box.

Notice that at the left side of the dialog box there are a number of different categories. Each category represents a number of different SmartArt layouts that you can choose from, based on the desired purpose of the graphic you want to create.

  • List. If you can present your information using a list (like a bulleted list, let's say), then you'll want to choose this group.
  • Process. This category has layouts that are great for presenting information that describes a process toward a completion. For instance, a farmer may have processes such as tilling, planting, weeding, and harvesting. Each process is a portion of an entire season's crop.
  • Cycle. If a process is cyclical (one that always comes around to the beginning after ending), then the layouts in this group are helpful. Truth be told, that example of the farmer in the Process group is applicable to the Cycle group.
  • Hierarchy. The classic example of a hierarchy layout is an organization chart. There are a number of things that can fit in this layout category, however—provided that a clear hierarchical relationship can be established between elements.
  • Relationship. If whatever you want to present is composed of related items, chances are that you can find a layout in this group. Here the relationships aren't as structured, as they are in the Hierarchy group.
  • Matrix. Got information that can be defined along multiple axes, such as time and money? Then you can probably put it in a matrix relationship.
  • Pyramid. If your information can be presented in a proportional manner (or reasonably proportional), then pyramid layouts may be just what you need. Think of the FDA's nutrition pyramid; that's the sort of thing that can fit in this group.

There are two additional categories available in Word 2010 and Word 2013 that aren't in Word 2007: Picture and Office.com. The Picture category is intended to help you use pictures in your SmartArt layout. The Office.com category isn't really a category, but a way to get additional layouts online.

Once you know which category you want to use, click it and then click one of the layouts in that category. Click on OK, and Word inserts the SmartArt in your document. A text pane also opens up right next to the SmartArt. It is in this text pane that you place the information you want to appear in the artwork.

When you are done entering the text for the artwork (what you enter or can enter depends on the type of SmartArt you are creating), click outside the SmartArt graphic, elsewhere in your document. The text pane disappears and Word rearranges your text to fit properly in the available layout space.

3-4-14

Adding a Table of Contents in Word

Here’s How to use Headings
1.      In your Word document, select the heading or sub heading of a section of the document.
2.      In the upper left corner, you should see a style-selection box; it will likely just display the word Normal (see inset).
3.      Click the down-arrow to open the styles menu, click on Heading 1 (you may need to scroll down to find it).
4.      The selection now matches the style and the style-selection box displays Heading 1 (the style applied to the text).
5.      Repeat for each section Heading.
6.      If you have sub sections, repeat but select Heading 2 from the styles menu.

 

Here’s How to create a Table of Contents

7.      Click in the document where you want to insert the table of contents.
8.      On the Insert menu, point to Reference, and click Index and Tables.
9.      Click the Table of Contents tab.
10.  To use one of the available designs, click a design in the Formats box. If you would like to, select any other table of contents options you want.
For Show levels, use the default of 3.
11.  Click OK.
12.  The table of contents should appear!
*       Update the table contents by placing the cursor anywhere on it then pressing the F9 key.

 

 

Getting Rid of Section Breaks, but Not Section Formatting

Word allows you to format your documents on three general levels: sections, paragraphs, and characters. Of the three, section formatting is often the most confusing formatting for people to understand. Other issues of WordTips detail how you can insert section breaks and apply section formatting.

If you have worked with sections before, you already know that if you delete a section break, the text before the break then adopts the section formatting characteristics of the section after the break. This may be what you want, but it can also be a pain if you want to delete the final section break in a document and you don't want the previous text to loose its section formatting.

Unfortunately, there is no intrinsic way to delete section breaks and maintain the formatting represented by that break. There is a workaround you can use, however:

  1. Place the insertion point at the end of the document, just after the final section break.

  2. If the section break just before the insertion point is a Continuous section break, press Ctrl+Enter to insert a page break.

  3. Display the Insert tab of the ribbon.

  4. Click the Header tool in the Header & Footer group, and then click Edit Header. The header is displayed and the insertion point is within it.

  5. Make sure the Link to Previous control is selected for both the header and footer. (You can switch between the header and footer by using the Go To Footer tool and the Go To Header tool.) This ensures that the final section in the document has the same header and footer as the section just before it.

  6. Click the Close Header and Footer tool.

  7. Place the insertion point just before the final section break.

  8. Display the Page Layout tab of the ribbon.

  9. Click the small icon at the bottom-right of the Page Setup group. Word displays the Page Setup dialog box. (See Figure 1.)

  10. 1

    Figure 1. The Page Setup dialog box.

  11. Immediately press Enter or click on OK.

  12. Place the insertion point just after the final section break.

  13. Press F4. Word applies to the last section the Page Setup formatting that you accepted in step 10 for the next-to-last last section.

  14. If there are no differences in column formatting between the two final sections, you can skip to step 20.

  15. Place the insertion point just before the final section break.

  16. Display the Page Layout tab of the ribbon.

  17. Click the Columns tool in the Page Setup group and then click More Columns. Word displays the Columns dialog box. (See Figure 2.)

  18. 2

    Figure 2. The Columns dialog box.

  19. Immediately press Enter or click on OK.

  20. Place the insertion point just after the final section break.

  21. Press F4. Word applies to the last section the column formatting that you accepted in step 17 for the next-to-last section.

  22. Select and delete the final section break.

  23. Select and delete the page break you inserted in step 2.

 

 

11/5/13

Using Multiple Tables of Contents

Word allows you to include multiple tables of contents in a single document. Thus, you can have a table of contents for each chapter of a book, even if all the chapters are in the same document.

In order to restrict the table entries for each separate table, you will have to use unique custom styles for each table. For example, you might use styles named "Chapter1Heading1", "Chapter1Heading2", and so on for the first chapter, and "Chapter2Heading1", etc., for the second chapter.

With your styles defined and applied to all the appropriate heads in your document, you are ready to generate the tables of contents. You can do this by following these steps:

  1. Position the insertion point at the location in the document where you want the table of contents.
  2. Display the References tab of the ribbon.
  3. At the left of the ribbon click the Table of Contents tool. Word displays a few options.
  4. Click Insert Table of Contents. Word displays the Table of Contents dialog box. (See Figure 1.)
  5. f

    Figure 1. The Table of Contents tab of the Table of Contents dialog box.

  6. Click on the Options button. Word displays the Table of Contents Options dialog box. (See Figure 2.)
  7. f

    Figure 2. The Table of Contents Options dialog box.

  8. Change the TOC Level column to reflect which styles you are using in the table of contents you are inserting. Thus, if you were using doing a TOC for Chapter 1, beside the "Chapter1Heading1" style you would place a 1 in the TOC Level column.
  9. Click on OK to close the Table of Contents Options dialog box.
  10. Click on OK to close the Table of Contents dialog box and generate the table of contents.

You should note that if, before following the above steps, your document already contains a TOC that was generated from a building block (done by selecting one of the predefined TOC styles), when you close the Table of Contents dialog box in step 8 the previous TOC is selected and you are asked if you want to replace it with the new TOC. In most instances you won't want; you'll want to add the new TOC to any you've already defined.

10/29/13

Precisely Adjusting Tab Stops

Tab stops allow you to quickly and accurately align information on a line in your document. If you are familiar with typewriters, then you are already familiar with the concept of tab stops. (Truth be told, I think that fewer and fewer people each year are still familiar with typewriters.) Word goes far beyond the rudimentary tab stops in typewriters, however. It allows you to set four different types of tab stops, as has been detailed other tips.

Once you have set your tab stops, you can adjust them easily. There are two ways you can do this. One of these ways is with the ruler, as described in a different tip. The other way is with the Tabs option, available from the Format menu. To adjust tab stops using this method, follow these steps:

  1. Make sure the insertion point is in the paragraph in which you want to adjust tabs.
  2. Display the Home tab of the ribbon.
  3. Click the small icon at the bottom-right of the Paragraph group. Word displays the Paragraph dialog box.
  4. Click the Tabs button. Word displays the Tabs dialog box. (See Figure 1.)
  5. word

    Figure 1. The Tabs dialog box.

  6. In the tab list below the Tab Stop Position box, select the tab stop you wish to adjust.
  7. Change the Alignment type, if desired.
  8. Click on Set.
  9. In the Tab Stop Position box, enter a measurement for a new tab stop position, then perform steps 6 and 7.
  10. Click on OK to close the Tabs dialog box.
10/8/13

Managing Corporate Templates

In a corporate environment that uses Word, it is not uncommon that the company has developed a standard set of templates that define the "look" wanted for corporate communications. Unfortunately, if users make changes to the styles within the templates (there are many ways to do this without even purposefully trying) then the original templates can easily become corrupted.

For instance, let's say that Mary uses the corporate template to create a letter, and then saves the letter to disk. Later, Bill creates a letter using the same template, but makes a couple of changes to the styles in the course of creating and saving his document. The next time Mary opens her letter, the style changes made by Bill will affect the look of her letter.

Getting around this problem involves a three-pronged approach. First, you need to save your corporate templates in a protected manner; second, you need to set up Word to access them properly; and third, you need to do some user education.

First, make sure your templates are stored on the company's network server in a special folder you created just for the purpose of storing the templates. Make sure that everyone has access to the folder, but it should be read-only access. In addition, it doesn't hurt to make sure that the templates are saved as read-only. If you have any problems with setting up and storing the templates in this manner, your network administrator should be able to do it quite quickly.

Second, follow these steps within Word:

  1. Display the Word Options dialog box. (In Word 2007 click the Office button and then click Word Options. In Word 2010 click the File tab of the ribbon and then click Options.)
  2. Click the Advanced option at the left of the dialog box.
  3. Scroll through the list of options until you see the General section.
  4. Click the File Locations button. Word displays the File Locations dialog box. (See Figure 1.)
  5. word

    Figure 1. The File Locations dialog box.

  6. Make sure that the Workgroup Templates specification points to the special network server folder you set up in the previous step.
  7. Make sure the User Templates option is set to a private folder either on the user's hard drive or within their space on the network server.
  8. Click OK.

Third, instruct users that if they want to make changes to a template (so they can use those changes over and over again) they should copy the template from the protected area on the network server to their user template area and give the template a new name. (This copying should take place outside of Word, using the capabilities of Windows itself.) Changes can now be made to the template without affecting anyone else.

9/24/13

Shading

Word provides a way you can shade the information in your document. This shading can be added in conjunction with any border you may specify for the paragraph. Word allows you to precisely control the degree of shading, as well. To add shading to a paragraph, follow these steps:

  1. Position the insertion point in the paragraph that you want to shade.
  2. Make sure that the Home tab is selected for the ribbon.
  3. In the Paragraph group, click the down-arrow to the right of the Shading tool. (This tool looks like a tilted paint bucket, spilling paint to the right.) Word displays a shading palette.
  4. Select one of the theme colors at the top of the palette. There are ten colors, and each option under the colors represents a different percentage of shading for that color.

You should understand that highlighting text using the shading settings is different than highlighting text using the highlighter tool. In many ways I think that using shading is simpler and more flexible. Why? Because you can apply the shading technique to styles and create a character style that incorporates shading. You can then apply the character style to anything you need shaded, and you can easily remove the style, search for the style, or replace the style with some other formatting. These things are harder to do with highlighting that is added through the use of the highlighting tool.

9/17/13

Columns within Text Boxes

As you are laying out your pages using the features of Word, it is not uncommon to use text boxes. You may have a need, however, to place multiple columns of text within a text box. Should be easy, right? After all, you can create columns within the regular body of a document, right?

Well, it is sort of easy. Fact of the matter is, there is no way to create multiple columns within a text box. However, you can use multiple text boxes, side-by-side, that are linked. This allows your text to freely flow from the left text box to the neighboring right text box, just as text would flow within columns.

Once you have your two text boxes placed next to each other and sized appropriately, you can link them (so the text flows properly) by following these steps:

  1. Right-click on the left text box (the one that will form the "left column" of your multi-column layout). Word displays a Context menu.
  2. Choose Create Text Box Link from the Context menu. The mouse pointer changes to a cup. When the pointer is located in the left text box (the one on which you clicked) it appears upright and normal. When you move the mouse pointer to the right text box (the one that will form the "right column" of your multi-column layout) it changes to a pouring cup, signifying that text could overflow into that column.
  3. Click in the right column. The mouse pointer returns to normal.

Enter your text in the left-most text box, as desired. When it reaches the bottom of the text box, it flows to the right text box. You can also format your text boxes so that borders appear as desired. For instance, if you want a single border around the entire two-columns you are creating, then make sure your two "column" text boxes appear within a larger text box. You can remove the borders from the column text boxes, but keep the border on the larger text box. If you then group the three text boxes, you can move them as a complete, single unit.

Another potential solution is to create a two-column, single-row table in your text box. You can then place information in either the left or right column of the table, as desired. The drawback to this approach, of course, is that text will not freely flow from one table column to the other.

8/27/13

Setting Your Default Document Directory

Normally, Word starts looking for documents in the directory in which you started the program. If you want to change the default directory path, you can do so in the following manner:

  1. Display the Word Options dialog box. (In Word 2007 click the Office button and then click Word Options. In Word 2010 click the File tab of the ribbon and then click Options.)
  2. Click Advanced at the left side of the dialog box.
  3. Scroll all the way to the bottom of the available options and locate the File Locations button. Click on it. Word displays the File Locations dialog box. (See Figure 1.)
  4. wrod

    Figure 1. The File Locations dialog box.

  5. Make sure the Documents option is selected from the list of file types. (This is the first choice in the list, and is typically selected by default.)
  6. Click on the Modify button. Word displays the Modify Location dialog box.
  7. Use the controls in the dialog box to locate the directory you want used as the default document directory.
  8. Click on OK. The directory you selected in step 6 should now appear in the Options dialog box.
  9. Click on OK to close the File Locations dialog box.
  10. Click on OK to close the Word Options dialog box.
6/28/13

Using Outline Numbering in a Table

The Tab key, in a table, is always used to move from one cell to another. To change indent levels—which gives you the next level of bullets or numbering—you need to use the Promote tool on the Outlining tab of the ribbon and, conversely, the Demote tool to return to a higher level.

If you prefer to not use the toolbar buttons, but instead want to use the keyboard, you can change the outline level by using Shift+Alt+Left Arrow or Shift+Alt+Right Arrow. These provide the same functionality as the Increase Indent and Decrease Indent buttons. If, for some reason, you want to actually add a tab character in the text appearing in a cell, you need to press Ctrl+Tab.

6/14/13

Randomly Resetting Numbering

The automatic numbering tool used in Word is one of the most poorly implemented and frustrating tools in the entire program. The problems are so bad that many people even advocate the complete abandonment of the feature, relying instead on manually numbering items in lists. (Believe it or not, that is exactly what is done whenWordTips is first created—the numbered steps that are so often used are created manually rather than automatically.) This approach obviously involves quite a bit of additional typing and formatting.

Rather than type in numbers manually, you can also use the SEQ field to number your lists. This takes just a bit of time to set up, but the result can be lists that are semi-dynamic. (Meaning that list elements renumber themselves if you have to reorganize a list.) For more information on the SEQ field, refer to past issues of WordTips.

If you want to try using Word's automatic numbering, then it is best to also use styles to define the appearance of the numbered items that appear in your document. You can create different styles for different types of lists, as well as different styles for the first items in lists and the rest of the items. Styles, of course, provide many other advantages that are beneficial when creating documents. If you share your documents with others, defined styles also help insure that your document will appear more true to your original intent when viewed on another machine.

5/27/13

In other WordTips you've learned how you can set up your form fields so that they perform calculations and display the results. When youprint your form, Word updates the fields so that the results of the calculations are displayed in the form. What if you don't want to wait until printing in order to view the results?

Fortunately, Word provides a way you can do this. Make sure you follow these steps:

  1. Unprotect your form so that you can change the options for each field.
  2. Select a form field used in a calculation.
  3. Make sure the Developer tab of the ribbon is displayed.
  4. Click on the Properties tool in the Controls group. Word displays the Options dialog box for the field. (See Figure 1.)
  5. word

    Figure 1. The Options dialog box for a form field.

  6. Make sure the Calculate on Exit check box is selected.
  7. Click on OK.
  8. Repeat steps 2 through 6 for each of the other fields used in your calculations.
  9. Protect the form again.

You can now use the form as normal. Whenever you press Tab to move between fields, and you leave a field used in a calculation, Word recalculates all the fields in the form. The result is that your calculated fields are always updated, as desired.

4/22/13

Reversing Print Order

When printing your document, Word allows you to print it either forwards or backwards. This is helpful if you have a printer that deposits printed pages one on top of the other, right side up, as they are printed. This is typical with certain models of inkjet and laser printers. When the printing order is reversed, then the final document will be collated properly. To control the printing order, follow these steps:

  1. Display the Word Options dialog box. (In Word 2007 click the Office button and then click Word Options. In Word 2010 display the File tab of the ribbon and then click Options.)
  2. Click Display at the left side of the dialog box.
  3. Scroll through the options until you see the Print section. (See Figure 1.)
  4. reverseprint

    Figure 1. The advanced options of the Word Options dialog box.

  5. Make sure the Print Pages in Reverse Order check box is selected or cleared, depending on your desires.
  6. Click on OK.
4/10/13

Collecting Highlighted Text Selections

 Follow these steps if you are using Word 2007:

  1. Press Ctrl+F. Word displays the Find tab of the Find and Replace dialog box.
  2. Make sure there is nothing in the Find What box.
  3. If it is available, click the More button. Word expands the dialog box to include additional controls. (See Figure 1.)
  4. word

    Figure 1. The expanded Find tab of the Find and Replace dialog box.

  5. Click Format and choose Highlight. The word "Highlight" appears just beneath the Find What box.
  6. Select the Highlight All Items Found In check box. The Find Next button changes to Find All.
  7. Click Find All. All of the highlighted text in the document is selected.
  8. Press Ctrl+C. All of the selections are copied to the Clipboard.
  9. Open a new, blank document.
  10. Press Ctrl+V.
3/16/13

Inserting the User's Address

Word automatically maintains several items of information about you, as a user. One such item is your address, which is changed on the User Information tab of the Options dialog box. If you want to automatically insert the user address in your documents, you can follow these steps:

  1. Position the insertion point where you want the address inserted.
  2. Make sure the Insert tab of the ribbon is selected.
  3. In the Text group, click Quick Parts. You'll see a drop-down menu.
  4. Choose Field. Word displays the Field dialog box. (See Figure 1.)
  5. word

    Figure 1. The Field dialog box.

  6. In the Categories drop-down list, choose User Information.
  7. In the Field Names list choose UserAddress.
  8. Click on OK to close the dialog box and insert your field.
2/22/13

Deleting Footnotes and Endnotes

If you have previously inserted footnotes or endnotes into your document and you want to later delete one of them, follow these steps:

  1. Highlight the footnote or endnote reference mark in your document. (In the document itself, not in the footnote or endnote area.)
  2. Press either Del or Ctrl+X.

The footnote or endnote is deleted, and if you are using auto-numbered footnotes or endnotes, the remaining notes in your document are renumbered.

You should note that it does no good to delete the footnote or endnote text; you must delete the footnote or endnote reference itself.

2/1/13

Inserting the Total Number of Pages in Your Document

It is not unusual to put a page number in your headers or footers, and the different ways of accomplishing that task are covered in other issues of WordTips. You can also, however, insert a field that indicates the total number of pages in a document. This can be used in a header or footer or directly within the text of your document. To insert the total number of pages in your document, follow these steps:

  1. Position the insertion point where you want the total number of pages to appear.
  2. Make sure the Insert tab of the ribbon is selected.
  3. In the Text group, click Quick Parts. You'll see a drop-down menu.
  4. Choose Field. Word displays the Field dialog box.
  5. In the Categories drop-down list, choose Document Information. (See Figure 1.)
  6. word

    Figure 1. The Field dialog box.

  7. In the Field Names list choose NumPages.
  8. Click on OK to close the dialog box and insert your field.
1/18/13

Automatically Updating Fields and Links

You can automatically update both fields and links when you print a document, but Word treats the two items differently when you are opening a file. Word provides a way to always update your links when opening a document. You can do this by following these steps:

  1. Display the Word Options dialog box. (In Word 2007 click the Office button and then click Word Options. In Word 2010 display the File tab of the ribbon and then click Options.)
  2. Click on Advanced at the left side of the dialog box. (See Figure 1.)
  3. word

    Figure 1. The General area of the Word Options dialog box.

  4. In the General area (scroll down a bit to see it), make sure the Update Automatic Links at Open check box is selected.
  5. Click on OK.

That setting should make sure that all your links are always up to date. If you want to update the fields when the document is opened, you'll need to use a macro to accomplish the task. Specifically, you'll need to use either an AutoOpen or AutoClose macro, depending on whether you want to update the fields when the document opens or closes. The following is an example of an AutoOpen macro you can use.

Sub AutoOpen()      With Options          .UpdateFieldsAtPrint = True          .UpdateLinksAtPrint = True      End With      ActiveDocument.Fields.Update  End Sub  

Note that the macro makes sure that the options are set to force updating the fields and links when printing occurs, then it updates all the members of the Fields collection in the document. If you, instead, wanted to update the fields at closing, you could use this macro:

Sub AutoClose()      ActiveDocument.Fields.Update  End Sub  

This macro is much shorter because there is no need to set the update-on-print options when you are exiting the document.

1-11-13

Embedding Fonts in a Document

The fonts you use in a document determine exactly how that document appears when viewed or printed. If you are sharing your documents with others, you will want to make sure that they have the same fonts you used in the document. If they don't, then they may not be able to read the information you send.

Why is this? If you use a particular font in a document, then send that document to another person who does not have that font on their system, Word tries to figure out what font it can use as a substitute for the font you used. In some cases, the results are an unreadable mess with symbols being substituted for characters and vice-versa. Even if the substituted font results in a readable document, your precise formatting may no longer apply since Word uses the character widths and sizing of the substituted font, not the original. Thus, text will flow differently on the target system and lines or pages will not break at the same place as originally intended.

Word does provide a potential solution to this mess: you can embed fonts in a document. Word allows you to embed fonts in your document, with a couple of caveats. First of all, the fonts must be TrueType fonts, and second, they must be available for embedding. Figuring out if a font is TrueType is easy enough—you can take a look at the Windows Font folder to figure that out, or you can simply look for the telltale TT next to the font name in Word's Font drop-down list.

Figuring out if a font is embeddable is another issue. When a font is created, by the designer, it can be set to one of four levels of embedding compatibility:

  • Fully Embeddable. These will embed in the document and install themselves on the target system if they do not already exist there.
  • Editable Embedding. The document is editable in the embedded font, but will not permanently install on the target system.
  • Print and Preview Only. The document will print with the correct font on the target system, but it is not editable and the font will not install.
  • Not Embeddable. The font stays on the original system and cannot be embedded in a document.

Word respects the wishes of the font designer, according to the possible settings show here. If a designer marks a font as "not embeddable," then you cannot embed it in a document. More precisely, you can instruct Word to embed TrueType fonts, but Word ignores your instruction when it comes to the font that is marked as not embeddable.

So how do you find out if a font is embeddable? There is no way to do so without a special tool that will read the font, examine the instructions of the designer in this regard, and then inform you of them. Such a tool is available for free from Microsoft; you can download it from the following address:

http://www.microsoft.com/typography/TrueTypeProperty21.mspx  

The tool updates Windows so it displays more information when you right-click on a font file and choose Properties. One of the tabs displayed in the resulting dialog box contains information on how a font can be embedded in a Word document.

If a font is not embeddable, then you are faced with a decision: whether to use the font or not. If you do use it, then the document will only display properly on systems where the font is really installed. If you don't use it, then you will need to find a different font that meets your design and sharing needs.

Once you know that a font can be embedded in a document, you need to instruct Word to do the actual embedding. You do this by following these steps:

  1. Display the Word Options dialog box. (In Word 2007 click the Office button and then click Word Options. In Word 2010 click the File tab of the ribbon and then click Options.)
  2. At the left of the dialog box click Save. (See Figure 1.)
  3. WordTip

    Figure 1. The save options in the Word Options dialog box.

  4. Make sure the Embed Fonts In the File check box is selected.
  5. If you will be using a small number of characters in a particular font, choose the Embed Only the Characters Used in the Document check box
  6. Click on OK.
  7. Work with your documents as normal.

You should know that when you embed a font, the size of your document can be significantly increased. If you don't choose the check box in step 4, then Word embeds the entire font. In either case (full font or just characters), the size of your document is increased by the size of the font being embedded, plus some overhead required by Word.

12/14/12

Splitting a Single Table into Two Tables

Word provides a powerful table editor that allows you to create and modify data in tabular format. If you are working with large tables, there may be times when you need to split a table in two. To do this, follow these steps:

  1. Position the insertion point anywhere in the row you want as the first row in the table that is split-off the larger table.
  2. Display the Layout tab of the Ribbon. (This tab is only visible if your insertion point is within a table.)
  3. Click the Split Table tool, within the Merge group.

The result is that Word inserts a Normal-formatted paragraph prior to the table row in which your insertion point was placed. The two resulting tables can now be treated independently.

12/7/12

Pulling Tables Back Into View

When you first add a table to your document, Word determines column width by dividing the space available between margins by the number of columns in the table. If you later add a column to the table, the inserted column will push the right edge of the table past the right margin. This may make it difficult to "grab" and resize the right-most column.

There are several ways to deal with this type of situation. For instance, you could change to landscape orientation, adjust the column widths, and then switch back to portrait orientation. Another thing to try is to switch to Draft view, as opposed to Print Layout view. This allows you to see the columns that extend past the right margin and make any adjustments.

If you want to adjust all the columns so everything fits as well as possible, follow these steps:

  1. Right-click anywhere within the table. Word displays a Context menu.
  2. Click on AutoFit. Word displays a submenu.
  3. Within the submenu, choose AutoFit to Contents.

The result is that Word adjusts your table so as much of each column is as visible as possible, within the limits of the page margins and according to how much information is in each column. This can sound confusing, and the effects are best understood by trying out the feature with different types of information in your table. If the table is empty, each column is made as narrow as possible, and you end up with a "scrunched" table. If there is information in the table, then each column is made as wide as possible to display all the information in that column. If the table is still too wide, Word narrows the widest columns, thereby wrapping the contents of those columns, until it can fit everything.

11/23/12

Adding a Document Background

You probably are already aware that Word provides many different ways for you to get fancy with your documents. For instance, you can add graphics and WordArt that convey information much better—at times—than mere words alone can.

One of the ways you can make your document fancy if it is destined for a Web page is to add a background. Simply follow these simple steps:

  1. Make sure the Page Layout tab of the ribbon is displayed.
  2. Click the Page Color option in the Page Background group. Word displays a small palette that shows colors and has a couple other choices.
  3. Choose the color you want to use for the background of your documents.

Note that the color you selected is visible as a background for the document. This background color is visible only if you are using Print Layout or Web Layout views. If you switch to a view that doesn't support the background color, the document looks normal again (with a white background), but switching back to a supporting view again displays the same background color.

If you want to get rid of the background, follow the same steps, above, but in the second step, choose "No Color" from the options.

10/19/12

Turning Off Automatic Numbered Lists

One of the ways in which Word tries to help you create documents faster is by automatically applying formatting to your document, based on what you type. One incarnation of this feature is seen when Word creates automatic numbered lists for you. When you enter some text that Word thinks should be a numbered list, and then press Enter, Word formats the paragraph with a hanging indent and places an appropriate number at the beginning of it. In addition, Word assumes the next paragraph will be part of the same numbered list.

For instance, if you type a number or letter, a period, and then theSpace Bar or the Tab key, and then type your text, when you pressEnter, Word formats the paragraph as a numbered list. This behavior works in all versions of Word prior to Word 2007. In Word 2007 the recognition that you are creating a list is different; when you type a number or letter, a period, and then the Space Baror the Tab key, Word recognizes that you are trying to make a numbered list and formats the paragraph accordingly.

If you didn't want the paragraph to be a numbered list item, you can cancel the formatting done by Word by immediately pressing Ctrl+Z after the automatic formatting is applied. If the automatic formatting bothers you a lot, you can follow these steps to turn it off in versions of Word prior to Word 2007:

  1. Choose AutoCorrect from the Tools menu. (In Word 2002 or Word 2003 choose AutoCorrect Options from the Tools menu.) Word displays the AutoCorrect dialog box.
  2. Make sure the AutoFormat As You Type tab is selected. (See Figure 1.)
  3. img1

    Figure 1. The AutoFormat As You Type tab of the AutoCorrect dialog box.

  4. Clear the Automatic Numbered Lists check box.
  5. Click on OK.

If you are using Word 2007 then you should follow these steps to turn off the automatic formatting:

  1. Click the Office button and then click Word Options. Word displays the Word Options dialog box.
  2. At the left side of the dialog box click Proofing.
  3. Click the AutoCorrect Options button. Word displays the AutoCorrect dialog box.
  4. Make sure the AutoFormat As You Type tab is selected.
  5. Clear the Automatic Numbered Lists check box.
  6. Click on OK.
10/5/12

Merge Adjacent Cells

Word contains a handy table editor that allows you to create complex tables. One of the features of the table editor is that you can merge adjacent cells together. Merging cells simply means that the adjacent cells are thereafter treated as a single cell, even though they are not really a single cell. If the cells are on the same row, you can merge them together by following these steps:

  1. Select two or more adjacent cells, on the same row or same column, that you want to merge.
  2. Choose Merge Cells from the Table menu.

You can also easily perform cell merging by using the Tables and Borders toolbar:

  1. Choose the Toolbars option from the View menu, and then make sure Tables and Borders is selected from the resulting submenu.
  2. Move the toolbar or adjust your document so you can see both your table and the toolbar.
  3. Click on the Eraser tool on the toolbar. This is the one just to the right of the tool that looks like a pencil.
  4. Click and drag to select the dividing lines between different cells. When you release the mouse button, the cells are merged.
  5. Use the Eraser tool to merge any other cells desired.
  6. Click on the Eraser tool again (on the toolbar) or press the Esc key. This turns off the Eraser tool.
  7. Close the Tables and Borders toolbar when finished
9/27/12

AutoFormatting a Document

Word includes a feature that formats what you type, as you type it. You probably take many of these automatic formatting (AutoFormat) adjustments for granted. Word does things like changing your quotes to Smart Quotes, automatically creating bulleted and numbered lists, and changing the indentation of paragraphs.

This is fine and good for many people, but what if you get a document from someone else and it needs a lot of the "little touches" applied to it? This is where the real industrial-strength AutoFormat feature of Word comes into play. You see, AutoFormat doesn't just work as you type—it also is available, on demand, to format an entire document.

In Word 2007 the AutoFormat tool is not available on the any of the ribbon tabs. Instead you'll need to add it to the Quick Access toolbar by following these steps:

  1. Click the Office button and then click Word Options. Word displays the Word Options dialog box.
  2. At the left of the dialog box choose Customize.
  3. Using the Choose Commands From drop-down list, choose Commands Not In the Ribbon.
  4. Locate and select the AutoFormat command in the list of commands.
  5. Click the Add button. The AutoFormat command moves to the right side of the dialog box.
  6. Click OK.

Once you have the AutoFormat tool available on the Quick Access toolbar, you can apply AutoFormat by following these steps in Word 2007:

  1. Load the document you want to format.
  2. Click the AutoFormat tool on the Quick Access toolbar. Word displays the AutoFormat dialog box. (See Figure 1.)
  3. Figure 1. The AutoFormat dialog box.

  4. Use the radio buttons to indicate if you want AutoFormat to work without stopping for your input, or not.
  5. Click on OK.

If you are using an older version of Word, you don't need to go through any process to add the command to your toolbars. Instead, follow these steps:

  1. Load the document you want to format.
  2. Choose AutoFormat from the Format menu. Word displays the AutoFormat dialog box.
  3. Use the radio buttons to indicate if you want AutoFormat to work without stopping for your input, or not.
  4. Click on OK.

At this point, AutoFormat works its magic and your document is "reformatted" to appear as it would have if you had typed it yourself.

You should understand that it is very unlikely that AutoFormat will do all the formatting you need done. Each document is different, and you should make sure you examine the document after AutoFormat is completed to see if there are any other formatting tasks you need to complete.

9/7/12

Open the Office Window on Two Different Views

Open the Office Window on Two Different Views

Here's a tip that applies to both Word and Excel in slightly different ways. By splitting the document window into two separate panes you can view and edit two widely-separated parts of a document at the same time. That means you can work on the first chapter of your novel in the top pane and the last chapter in the bottom pane, and jump between them simply by clicking the mouse—or by tapping F6 to cycle between the two panes, the ribbon, and the status bar. Word even lets you change the zoom level in the two panes, as shown here, so that you can view multiple pages in one pane while viewing full-size text in the other. You can split the window by dragging the splitter bar at the very top of the vertical scroll bar, or open the View tab on the Ribbon and select Split (or Remove Split to restore a single window). Excel has a similar split-window feature but unfortunately doesn't let you choose different zoom levels in each pane.—

8/31/12

Line and Paragraph Spacing

Introduction

Lesson 9

An important part of creating effective documents lies in the document design. When designing your document and making formatting decisions, you will need to know how to modify the spacing. In this lesson, you will learn how to modify the line and paragraph spacing in various ways.

Line Spacing

Watch the video (3:06). Need help?

Watch the video to learn about line and paragraph spacing.

About Line Spacing

Line spacing can either be measured in lines or points. For example, when text is double-spaced, the line spacing is two lines high. On the other hand, you might set 12-point text with something like 15-point spacing, which gives enough height for the text plus a little extra space. You can reduce the line spacing to fit more lines on the page, or you can increase it to improve readability.

Line spacing is also known as leading (pronounced to rhyme with "wedding").

To Format Line Spacing:

  1. Select the text you want to format.
  2. Click the Line and Paragraph Spacing command in the Paragraph group on the Home tab.
  3. Select the desired spacing option from the drop-down menu.
    Changing the line spacingChanging the line spacing
  4. From the drop-down menu, you can also select Line Spacing Options to open the Paragraph dialog box. From here, you can adjust the line spacing with even more precision.
    Fine-tuning the line spacingFine-tuning the line spacing

If you select At least or Exactly in the Paragraph dialog box, the line spacing will be measured in points. Otherwise, it will be measured in lines.

Paragraph Spacing

Just as you can format spacing between lines in your document, you can also choose spacing options between each paragraph. Typically, extra spaces are added between paragraphs, headings, or subheadings. Extra spacing between paragraphs helps to make a document easier to read.


To Format Paragraph Spacing

  1. Click the Line and Paragraph Spacing command on the Home tab.
  2. Select Add Space Before Paragraph or Remove Space After Paragraph from the drop-down menu.
    Adding space before a paragraphAdding space before a paragraph
  3. From the drop-down menu, you can also select Line Spacing Options to open the Paragraph dialog box. From here, you can control exactly how much space there is before and after the paragraph.
    Fine-tuning the paragraph spacingFine-tuning the paragraph spacing
5/18/12

Inserting a Copyright Mark

There are a number of special symbols that are often used in the course of creating a document. One common symbol is the copyright mark, which is a small letter C surrounded by a circle. Copyright marks are easy to add to your document, assuming you are using a version of Word that has AutoCorrect and that it hasn't been turned off or modified. If this is the case, you should be able to type a lowercase C surrounded by parentheses—as in (c)—and Word will automatically change the three characters to a copyright mark.

If you have AutoCorrect turned off, there are a number of other ways you can insert a copyright mark. If you use the keyboard a lot, you can simply press Ctrl+Alt+C. If you prefer to use the mouse, you can follow these steps:

  1. Display the Symbol dialog box by displaying the Insert tab of the ribbon, clicking Symbol, and then More Symbols (Word 2007) or choosing Symbol from the Insert menu (older versions of Word).
  2. Click on the Special Characters tab. (See Figure 1.)
  3. Figure 1. The Special Characters tab of the Symbol dialog box.

  4. Choose Copyright from the list of available characters.
  5. Click on OK.

1/6/12

Format Brush

Apply text and graphics formatting multiple times in Office    

Have you ever wanted to make several non-sequential words stand out by using a special font in your document? Or have you ever wanted to change certain solid lines to dotted lines in graphics created with the drawing tools? If you've ever wanted to apply the same format to items in different locations in a file, you might not realize how easy it is. Instead of clicking the Format Painter button on theStandard toolbar every time you want to apply the new format, you can take advantage of the button's "sticky" feature.

  1. Select the item whose format you would like to copy.
  2. To copy the selected format to several items, double-click the Format Painter button. The button stays selected, or "sticky."
  3. Select the text or graphic where you want to apply the new format.
  4. When you're finished applying the format, click Format Painter again, or press ESC.
10/21/11

Changing Kerning - (The space between each character)

    • Select the text whose kerning you want to adjust.
    • Display the Font dialog box. (In Word 2007 press Ctrl+D. In earlier versions of Word choose Tools | Font.)
    • Make sure the Character Spacing tab is selected. 
    • Click  on the Kerning for Fonts checkbox.
    • Adjust the character point size to indicate when Word should start adjusting kerning.
    • Click on OK.

In most cases, this type of kerning will be acceptable. There may be instances, however, when you want to manually adjust the kerning between two characters. For instance, you might want to create some special effect for the characters. In these cases you can manually adjust kerning by following these steps:

  • Select the text whose kerning you want to adjust.
  • Display the Font dialog box. (In Word 2007 press Ctrl+D. In earlier versions of Word choose Tools | Font.)
  • Display the Character Spacing tab.
  • Clear the Kerning for Fonts check box.
  • In the Spacing pull-down list, select Expanded or Condensed, depending on whether you want to move the characters further apart or closer together.
  • In the By box to the right of the Spacing pull-down list, indicate the amount of space (in points) by which the character spacing should be adjusted.
  • Click on OK
8/12/11

Changing Bullet Types:

  • Make sure the Home tab of the ribbon is displayed.
  • Locate the Bullets tool within the Paragraph group. Click the down-arrow at the right of the Bullets tool. Word displays a palette of options.
  • Select a bullet style from those shown in the Bullet Library portion of the palette.
  • If you don't like any of the styles shown, click Define New Bullet. Word displays the Define New Bullet dialog box.
  • Click the Symbol button. Word displays the Symbol dialog box.
  • Select a symbol to use as a bullet from among those shown.
  • You can select a different set of symbols by selecting a different typeface in the Font drop-down list.
  • When you have selected a symbol, click on OK. Word displays the Define New Bullet dialog box again.
  • Click on OK to close the dialog box.
5/1/11

Page Breaks in Word

There may be times when you need to start a new page in an existing Word document. Many people just keep hitting the Enter key until the cursor scrolls down to the new page.  

Word lets you insert a Page Break in a document. This ends the current page but starts a new, consecutive page. You can use either the menu commands or quick keys from the keyboard; each time-saving method is described below.

Here’s How

From the menu

  • Click where you want to start a new page.
  • On the Insert menu, click Break.
  • Click Page break.
  • Click OK.

From the Keyboard

Instead of using menu commands, simply press the CTRL and ENTER keys together.